Road

Road transport is the main contributor to the growth of transport emissions. However, emissions have decreased significantly due to the economic downturn, and to changes in VRT and road tax introduced in 2008. Total energy consumption in road transport also decreased (after four succesive years of increases), by 1.1% in 2017 ( petrol, -9.8%, diesel +0.4% and biofuels +35.6%). However, when considering cross border fuel tourism, total energy consumption grew by 2.1% in 2017 (petrol -8.5%, diesel +4.6% and biofuels +39.3%). Total diesel use (bio and fossil) increased in 2017 by 6.2%. Looking at the underlying drivers, the number of passenger diesel cars increased by 10.3% in 2017 while the number of passenger petrol cars decreased by 6.0%, commercial vehicle numbers increased by 2.3% and employment grew by 3.1% between Q4 2016 and Q4 2017 (EPA, 2019). 

The Biofuels Obligation Scheme has contributed to mentioned decreases. It started operation in mid-2010 with biofuels displacing petrol and diesel use in the transport sector. The problem with transport emissions arises from a number of areas including the increased number of cars and inefficient driving patterns. For example, a recent survey by the National Transport Authority (NTA) found that nearly half of daily car trips are less than 3km in length. 

Energy Efficient Vehicles

The Society of the Irish Motor Industry (http://www.simi.ie/ ) presents the carbon emissions factors of all vehicles available in Ireland.  The type of vehicle you or your company drives can have a very different impact on your carbon footprint.

For example Toyota markets cars that range in emissions from a Prius at 104g of CO2 per km up to the V8 land cruiser at 282g of CO2 per km  (figures are combined emissions over 100km).  A fuel efficient car will not only save you money on VRT, Motor Tax and fuel, but it will help you to reduce your carbon footprint.  Using the above example, the emissions from a Prius over 20,000km would amount to approximately 2.1 tonnes of CO2 compared to 5.6 tonnes from the Landcruiser over the same distance.  There is considerable scope for individuals and companies to reduce transport emissions through informed choice of vehicle; leading to significant savings both economically and to the environment. 

Eco-Driving

Generally, fuel consumed in everyday driving is lost in many ways, such as engine inefficiency, aerodynamic drag, rolling friction, energy required to climb hills, and energy lost to braking. Energy efficient driving (eco-driving) can influence all of these. Eco-driving is about driving in a style suited to modern engine technology: smart, smooth and safe driving techniques that lead to average fuel savings of 5-10%. Eco-driving offers numerous benefits for drivers of cars, vans, lorries and buses with cost savings and fewer accidents as well as reductions in emissions and noise levels. 


Smarter Travel Work Places

This is a public awareness programme working with employers to implement voluntary workplace travel plans. For businesses it gives information on setting up a workplace travel plan plus information on the Taxsaver Commuter Ticket Scheme.


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