Pollution and Anti-Litter Awareness Initiatives

The official framework to deal with litter pollution in Ireland is covered by the Litter Pollution Acts 1997 to 2009. Under these acts, the responsibility lies with the local authority  to manage and respond to littering in their area. It is also the role of the local authorities to keep public areas clear of litter by managing the collection of litter from public bins and providing cleaning programmes of public areas, including public roads.
 

Anti-Litter Awareness Initiatives: Local Authority Grant Scheme

Each year local authorities receive a grant to fund anti-litter awareness initiatives. Each authority develops anti-litter campaigns to increase public awareness of litter pollution. Since 2008, local authorities have also been awarded a grant for anti-graffiti awareness activities. A particular focus is placed on developing voluntary initiatives working with the community, environmental groups and schools.


National Spring Clean
 

National Spring Clean is an anti-litter initiative that was set up in 1998. Communities organise a clean up of their local area during the month of April. Photography competitions are also run for the participants of the clean up. Another initiative is Tidy Towns. A step-up from the original National Spring Clean Campaign which ran between 1953 and 1957, TidyTowns rapidly developed its own identity and has gone on to become Ireland's most well known and popular local environmental initiative.


Election Posters

New regulations were introduced in the Electoral (Amendment) (No. 2) Act 2009 to combat the litter problem arising from posters used during election times. Under the act, posters can now only to erected within a limited time period. The time period is either (a) 30 days before the poll date or (b) from the date the polling day order (or equivalent) for the election has been completed, whichever provides the shorter period of time.



 


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